Introduction to Microsoft Access 2016 Databases

Introduction

Microsoft Access is a database creation and management program. To understand Access, you must first understand databases.

In this lesson, you will learn about databases and how they are used. You will familiarize yourself with the differences between data management in Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Finally, you will get a look ahead at the rest of the Access tutorial.

What is a database?

A database is an accumulation of information that is put away in a PC framework. Databases enable their clients to enter, get to, and examine their information rapidly and effectively. They’re such a helpful instrument, to the point that you see them constantly. Ever paused while a specialist’s secretary entered your own data into a PC, or watched a store worker utilize a PC to see whether a thing was in stock? Assuming this is the case, at that point you’ve seen a database in real life.

The least demanding approach to comprehend a database is to consider it an accumulation of records. Consider one of the databases we specified over: the database of patient data at a specialist’s office. What records are contained in a database like this? To begin with, there’s a rundown of patients’ names. At that point there’s a rundown of past arrangements, a rundown with medicinal history for every patient, a rundown of contact data, et cetera.

This is valid for all databases, from the least difficult to the most intricate. For example, on the off chance that you jump at the chance to heat you may choose to keep a database containing the kinds of treats you know how to make and the companions you give these treats to. This is one of the least complex databases possible. It contains two records: a rundown of your companions, and a rundown of treats.

An illustration of two lists

In any case, in the event that you were an expert bread cook, you would have numerous more inclines to monitor: a rundown of clients, a rundown of items sold, a rundown of costs, a rundown of requests, etcetera. The more records you include, the more mind boggling the database will be.

An illustration of many lists

In Access, records are somewhat more intricate than the ones you compose on paper. Access stores its arrangements of information in tables, which enable you to store much more nitty gritty data. In the table beneath, the People list in the beginner dough puncher’s database has been extended to incorporate other significant data on the pastry specialist’s companions.

An illustration of many lists

 

In the event that you know about different projects in the Microsoft Office suite, this may help you to remember Excel, which enables you to arrange information comparatively. Indeed, you could manufacture a comparable table in Excel.

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Introduction to Microsoft Access 2016 Databases

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